End of the Year Update

We’re coming to a close on 2018 and I’m now 9 years and 4 months into my renovation. We’ve moved in permanently in the basement, so that means the place is starting to come together enough to be habitable. I have a lot more to do, but here’s where we are at the end of the year.

After having the kitchen cabinets installed, we had to remove everything on the first floor for the final finish coat of the floors.

This is looking from the central kitchen area into the sunroom addition. This is the last time the house will be empty, and looking at this is bitter-sweet for me. I know that at my age, this is the last large renovation project I’ll do in my lifetime. Those of you who do your own renovation work know of the life-connection you have with your work. Many may see just wood and paint, but you feel within the space the effort, the thought and care, the mistakes and triumphs. It’s a satisfying feeling.

From the same camera potion, if I look to my left the original living room is finished. I finally installed the gas fireplace. It has been waiting since 2011. Fortunately it works.

And pivoting a little more, the view into the kitchen. The counters and tile back splashes need to be installed, and the dishwasher, and the three sinks, and the garbage disposals, oh and the hot water dispenser – the TV… I better stop, I’m getting exhausted thinking about my to-do list.

The stair treads are finished, but not installed. I put a lot of effort into having all the floors continuous throughout the house, another small element that makes the home visually flow from one room to the next.

All of the major trim is finished and just small projects remain for the rest of the first floor.

My office has the original plaster lath walls and ceiling. It took hours of grinding out cracks and plaster repair, but it was worth it.

My wife’s office. I was able to repair the plaster walls and ceilings in this room as well. The color is BM Wedgwood Gray- which is not gray, but it is a color we both like. It has a Scandinavian feel with the white painted trim.

And, as you can surmise, as the year closes I’m still holding a long list of things to do – and really, that’s the way I like it.

Here’s hoping that each of you have the best year yet to come – that 2019 will grant you peace, happiness, health and memories that last a lifetime.

Happy New Year!

Advertisements

One Shot Post


It’s Thursday afternoon and working on kitchen cabinet details…

Stay tuned..


May Updates in July

Well, I think I previously noted that my updates would be more current – and I’m certainly trying. But cleaning out our current house and wading through collections of 40 years in the making has been a real time-suck. But we’ll march on. Where were we? Oh, yes updates!

Back in the master bathroom and it’s time to make some more sawdust. I decided on two sizes of sinks here. I just usually brush my teeth and go – my wife on the other hand, likes a big sink to splash around in. I’ll swap these, as I’m left handed and she is right. (A tip for a long marriage – she is always right).


It’s gotta start somewhere – we prop up a couple sticks and start the process.

A face frame is made to fit the space.

A quick double check of the clearances and we’re good to go.

Outside in the garage, we cut some more sticks. I’ll make double doors on each side.

Once cut to size a rail and stile bit on the router makes the pieces.

Doors assembled and fine trimmed to size.This is clear grade poplar, which is a nice fine-grained wood perfect for painting.

The frame fitted again with drawer dividers added in the center. Measurements are taken for the cabinet boxes.

While I’m working on the vanity – these lights keep reminding me of my purchasing mistakes. I’m out to replace the small chandelier wanna-be and the wall sconces that I’ve complained about in previous posts. I just have to find the right ones to take their place.

For an evening break, I finished up the wall details and paint in the under eave storage areas.

Finishing up the baseboards. The white oil finish on oak floors will probably never be seen in these areas – but you never know when I’m in the dog house, I might just hang out in here.

These two storage areas are accessed from the main pointy closet with the little doors I cut from full sized 6 panel wood doors. Each has power and lights, so I’m ready if I’m banished from the living space.

Meanwhile, I added some old furniture temporarily so I could act like I live here. The floors will need one more coat of finish after the kitchen goes in, so everything has to come out one more time.

But that didn’t stop my wife from dragging Hercules out of storage and putting another orchid on top. He’s an old Victorian carved wood stand purchased many years ago. Now I have to find his round marble top…it’s in here somewhere…[ rustling, clanging, and crunching sounds ]

And in the meantime I’ve dragged this Japanese Butterfly Maple home. It’s a really old one and not too pretty, but it has potential…something else to keep me busy.

See you soon. enjoy the summer!

OK, Now I’m in the Mudroom

How about this? Two posts in one day? Well,this one will get me updated to real time – as in this morning. I was happily painting cabinet doors at 3:30am today, and got most of the Mudroom projects completed – so why not get this post out of the way.

One item added was a rail and coat hooks above the shoe storage bench.

We left the mudroom like this for the past few years. Looks like we need to make some cabinet doors.

First things first. We have to clean this place up! It’s a little tricky, so I decided to make another half-a**ed scaffold. No issue with falling off and being wheelchair bound this time. It was the only way to get to the tops of the cabinets and window without risking breaking the granite counters.

I used a small scale white subway tile for the back splash.

The left side has an electrical feed for a receptacle. This whole circuit is on a gfci line as required by code.

I used a light silver grout to match the lighter tones of the granite.

I cut an angled block to mount the 4 socket receptacle – the angle makes it easy to plug in appliances or whatever. I didn’t like those exposed screws used to mount the power strip.

So I made a couple of covers that fit over the mounting tabs to make it look more built in.

Now we get out the stile and rail router bits to make the cabinet doors.

The first fitting of the doors. I made them inset, like the rest of the cabinets I’ve made. All of the trim around the tile and windows was fabricated and finished. The cabinet doors are 40″ tall, so they looked a little bland.

So I took some inspiration from the original cabinet doors that flank the living room fireplace. I wanted to avoid glass doors in the mudroom, as I didn’t want to see boxes of laundry detergent every time I walked in the room.

So I made a mock up of the same design to see if it would work as an overlay. OK

While I was at it I made a pair of plain shaker doors for the sink base cabinet.

So I painted the doors and got them back on their hinges by 8:00am this morning.

I need some doorknobs. Hang in there – more to come. But not today.

 

Siding an Old House #3 Putting it on the wall

The old Misadventures project is moving along – as fast as an old man that walks like a penguin can go. The siding was supposed to be done last Fall, but that didn’t happen. I’m determined to finish it this year before the snow shows up – fingers crossed.

1 corner trimFirst up – the corner trim. There’s only one inside corner on the house where siding meets siding – the others are stone to siding. I’ve made a corner trim piece from 5/4 (1″ thick) Azek stock. I put it together with PVC glue and exterior trim head screws.

2 corner trim installThe trim piece was screwed in the corner with cortex screws on top of the rain screen.

3 stone trim 1One problem that having no plan is that mistakes happen. The problem here is that the 5/4 trim stock was put in place next to the stone when it was installed. This made it too thin to cover the edge of the siding because of the thickness of the rain screen. The solution was to add another piece of stock to build up the width.

4 stone trim 2The same trim piece was added to the stone junctures with siding.

5 felt paperThe 30 pound asphalt felt is continued around the house over the old house wrap.

6 rain screenThe GreenGuard rain screen is attached with plastic cap nails. It is butted up against the black drainage mat to allow moisture to drain into the weeps embedded in the stone.

7 stone beltingI had enough limestone left over so that I could cover the old brick foundation.

8 siding startThe start of siding – finally. I’m using HardiePlank lap siding. This is a cement-based product. I’m using the smooth finish – not the wood-grain texture, as this is what would have been originally used. I’m using a 6″ reveal, so the total height of each piece is 7 1/4″. They come is 12′ lengths.

9 siding kickerYou are required to use a 1 1/4″ spacer (kicker) on the bottom of the 1st course, to keep the angle of the siding the same. I used a 5/16″ thick piece of PVC trim, you can use a strip of the siding for this spacer, but I though the PVC would be waterproof. .

10 siding notchesThe Hardie siding was notched with a diamond blade in an angle grinder. All cut edges are sealed with the same paint. The color is BM White Heron Low Luster. More on painting later.

11 water table spacersThe good thing is that the water table is level and makes putting on the first course easy. The second course required spacer blocks that kept the reveal at 6″. The stud locations were marked on the rain screen and the siding nailed into the studs. The siding is attached with stainless steel 2″ ring shank siding nails. I’m using a Bostitch Coil Siding Nailer.

12 joint flashingAt each siding joint a flashing is required. I used the recommended coated aluminum coil stock behind each joint. You must use a coated aluminum material, as raw aluminum will react with the cement in the siding.

So not too exciting, but we are making progress…