February is Finished

As another month has come to a close, there hasn’t been a lot going on at the MisAdventures project. I’ve been under the weather and a little bit lazy. It’s nice to have frigid days for an excuse.

But a few projects are finally ticked off the list, so let’s get them documented, shall we?

1

We’ll go back upstairs and pick up on the master bathroom vanity. We left it at this point, with the door panels made and the face frame ready to be fitted to the space.

2

We then test fitted the vanity face frame to make sure it fits before we continue.

3

Since I’ve covered making a vanity from left over wood here I thought we would skip the details, as it’s nearly identical the the linked post. I’ve painted the vanity with BM Sterling, the same color as the walls. It’s then finished with several coats of Varathane water-base clear for protection. My wife wanted wider center drawers that turned out to be a problem for the top drawer/sink clearance, but I’ll adjust for that – perhaps in March or April.

4

On the opposite side of the room I’ve got the sit down vanity shelf and drawer in place between the two closets.

5

The counters were installed and are now waiting for me to tile the surround. Perhaps in March or April.

6

This is the second set of sink faucets for the bathroom. My first attempt didn’t allow enough clearance between the counters and the mirrors…you’ll see.

7

Because of the build up of the floor height and the counter height vanity, I have less clearance and needed the low profile faucets to make it work. Live and learn. Here I’m finishing up the plumbing – actually I’m taking a picture – but I was finishing up the plumbing.

8

And to make it a little more interesting the sinks are different sizes. I stayed in a hotel that had a large and small sink and thought it would work with this 5 foot wide vanity. You know who gets the little sink – ( I’m raising my hand). It works pretty well, with more room for my wife’s nightly doo-dad skin cream washing the face – and other aesthetic gymnastics. Me I just brush my teeth.

9

Still more to do up here, like tiling the mirror area. Something perhaps I’ll do in March or April..do you see a pattern here? The counters are quartz instead of natural stone that I have in the kitchen. The new quartz looks like natural stone and is low maintenance.

10

The other item checked off the list is the staircase to the second floor. The antique railings and handrails are finished and in place.

11

The floors are finished and I just need to get a presentable curtain by the tub. The bed sheet with painters tape is not quite the design statement I’m going for. The windows are tinted and you can’t see inside during the day – but at night I prefer not to show off to the neighbors. Something perhaps I’ll do in March or April..not the showing off part – getting the new window shades.

12

 

Final prep and painting of the risers. As I covered earlier, I drilled pocket screws holes in the stringers to fasten the treads from underneath.

13

The treads were attached with an ample application of PL glue on the stringers and Kreg screws were used the fasten the treads.

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I wanted to attach the back of each stair tread to the riser but didn’t want to use a glue that might mar the face of the risers. After a little research I used a 3-M VHB (Very High Bond) tape on the back of each tread. It was then fastened with 6 screws that were pre drilled in the riser and fastened from the back. They use this tape to hold glass windows in skyscrapers, so I thought it would work for my application. It makes for a very solid squeak free staircase. The tape is not only incredibly strong, it isolates the tread from the riser preventing any squeaks.

14

The first tread was the only one I couldn’t screw to the stringer, so it was PL glued in place and weights applied for a couple of days. VHB tape and screws were used at the back.

15

The final three treads from the mudroom into the kitchen were also installed. So we finally finished something!

And March is here and hopefully in the next few weeks it will be warm enough to get out the tile saw and get to work. We shall see…yes we will.

 

 

 

 

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Sunroom Window Trimming

Now that we are back on the ground we can trim out the big windows in sunroom. We have 7 in here and all will get the same design treatment – except the two on the end wall that will be wrapped with bookcases.

1 jamb jointFirst we rip the jamb stock to size – just a little wider than the surrounding drywall. These will be painted, so I’m using poplar – a very good wood for projects like this because of it’s easy workability and tight grain to make that Oh-so-smooth finish. You see that I have a routed joint – it will make your life so much easier when doing window jambs, as it keeps the joint perpendicular.

2 router spacerI always make as many jigs or templates to make the job go quickly. If you have more than a couple of anything – this is the best way to speed things up. Here I have a spacer that is exactly the width of the router base to the straight edge jig.

3 router jigHere’s a picture of a jig setup for routing the bookcase around the windows – but it’s the same idea. The template rests against the straight edge jig and is lined up with the marks where you want the joint to be. I’ll get into detail in the next couple of posts.

4 stool cutI assemble the three sides of the jamb – the top and sides. So you have a ‘U’ shaped piece glued and nailed together. I then make the stool – the sill of the window. I shim this at both sides of the window and set the ‘U’ on top.

5 loose stoolI shim and nail the ‘U’ in place and add the side casings to the windows as well. Here you see the window trimmed but the stool (sill) is removable. I do this because it’s easier for me to get the proper reveal on the sill this way. Most will set the stool first and work off of that. So I’m different – deal with it 🙂

6 tight stoolStools in place and fastened.

7 casing blockAs mentioned earlier – I use templates and whatever to make things go quicker and more accurate. I use this block of wood to get the reveal the same all around. Make the block flush with the jamb and you have a uniform reveal. The clamp comes in handy when the side casing might be a little bowed. A little pressure on the clamp and it will straighten it out.

8 octagon jambsThe octagon window jamb was easy. I had made two when I installed the same window in the upstairs closet.

9 octagon casing cutThe eight pieces are cut for the casing – looks like it’ll work.

10 pocket screw jigTo assemble I make one pocket hole with a Kreg tool. Only one is needed, as it’s mainly used as a way to clamp the pieces together.

11 finished octagonThe finished casing glued and ready to put up.

12 bookcase wallThe casing up and all the windows have been trimmed and back banded – all but these two, which get bookcases built around them – that I haven’t designed yet. Nothing like waiting to the last minute. But I have my yellow pad there…

12 window casing with back bandHere are the two big boys – 8’6″ each. All trimmed out with back banded casing. (That’s the piece that ‘picture frames’ the side and head casing) and the apron below the stool (sill).

13 waspAnd all the time this guy kept me company. I think it was his uncle I was swatting at when I fell off the ladder last year.

This time I left him alone – lesson learned.