The Pointy Closet #3 where we are as of today

Here is the final post for the pesky pointy closet. As I write this, I’m still working on this space. The final floors will go in soon on the second floor, so all is ready for this final step. So let’s finish this up, shall we?

We left off from post #2 looking like this. Well, it’s pointy enough, but this is a vintage house built in 1935. Seems like it needs a little more character than just drywall everywhere.

So since I have several rooms with wood on the ceiling and walls, let’s panel the front wall with a little board and batten. We’ll cover the surface with plywood and make it look and feel authentic. OK.

Once the front wall is done, we might as well do the back wall as well….and what the heck…

Let’s just panel the whole room. This will give it a little more of the vintage feel – and will take a couple more weeks to get to this point.

And we just keep covering the wall/ceiling with 1/4″ plywood and rabbeted wood battens. I added a light block to the front wall and a little wall sconce above the window.

In my mocked up design I’m planing to add a shelf along each side over the ‘wings’ that protrude out from the sides of the closet. I contemplated a painted shelf, or some type of wood. I didn’t want to spend a lot of money on the shelves. They’re 10′ long on each side.

So I went to Menard’s and looked through the lumber section for some ideas. I came up with some cedar that I thought would work, but it wasn’t wide enough.

So I went through the whole stack and found 2 pieces of 1X10’s and 2 pieces of 1X6 that were nearly a perfect match. I glued them up and sanded then down and they look pretty good. You can see the seam running down the middle.

A test fit to see if the shelves are the right width. I made these 12″ wide. The closet is not very practical, so we’re going to make it as useful as possible. I thought the shelves would be slightly helpful.

Having the shelves test fit out of the way, we can add a little finish to the sanded shelves. A mixture of boiled linseed oil, varnish and mineral spirits give the grain a little depth before the final finishes go on.

While the shelves are being finished, the board and batten details are added to the lower sections of the closet. We had to make a little do-dad detour around the vent as well.

The finishing is going on. A mixture of 50/50 latex paint and water. This is put on to allow the grain to slightly show through.

A few coats of wipe-on polyurethane and we have the shelves ready to go in. Now we just have to finish the walls.

The white washed walls are finished. The openings on either side of the wing area will get fitted drawers and shelves – something I haven’t made yet.

All of the whitewash is on the ceiling/walls. So now we’re going to add a little color.

And what would be better than a nice coat of Tiffany Blue.

The first coats go on to give the room a little color.

All of the surfaces get a good sanding to 220. This lets some of the grain show through.

This is why I paneled the whole room. The wood panel grain showing through is the vintage feel I was looking for in this pointy little closet.

The high gloss finish on the shelves enhance the grain of the cedar. Also the bottom of the shelves are recessed. I plan on using blocks of cedar that are removable that can be recharged with cedar oil to make this a cedar closet.

As usual, I looked for a long time to find this little light fixture. I thought it had a vintage, almost Scandinavian design. It has a frosted glass shade which I also like. I’m thinking this light will be used as a night light when everything is finished. Also, this blue was antiqued and over-glazed several times to give it a texture of a wall that had been painted many times over the years.

Six foot closet rods are added between the wings for hanging space.

One on either side will give us 12′ of usable hanging space.

8 coats of satin Varathane clear coating is needed to get a uniform sheen, with sanding between coats and finishing out at 400 grit. Does it take time? Yep, but that’s what this art project is all about. I modified the two pendant lights to make them fit the space.

So that brings the pointy closet up to date. I’m waiting for the floor guy to come back and finish installing the floors. And to make this space even more impractical all of the floors on the second floor are white.

Stay tuned, no telling what’s going to happen next.

 

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The Pointy Closet Post #1

Greetings fellow renovators! Sorry for a late post, still working away on all kinds of things at the MisAdventures project. I’ll introduce a 3 part series on the pointy closet that gave me so much trouble. Three posts? Yep, you’ll see. So let’s start at the beginning of this closet odyssey .

Well, maybe not at the very beginning. This is the earliest photo I could find of my destruction. This is the 2nd floor closet that I’ve already got my destructive little hands on. I can only imaging what my wife was thinking when I started tearing this apart 7 years ago. Yep 7 – and it’s not done yet – but we’re getting close.

We’ll revise this little problem closet several times – you’ll see. Here I quickly framed out the new closet space with a nifty pocket door. I thought I had it all figured out.

It wasn’t long before I had drywall cut and in place, with all those fancy angles. Moving along quickly – what could possibly go wrong?

I cut out the ceiling to remove the surface mount florescent light.

And will a little time and materials, I have a new ceiling with recessed lighting. Almost done – I can see the finish line.

We just need to drywall this end and we’re home free!

I’m so close to getting this closet done! Just a couple more pieces of drywall.

Crap! I knew it couldn’t be that easy. It’s right here – at this very moment in time that I had another ‘what if’ moment. Those are always bad for me. I decided to replace the staircase with a new, safer one. That will mean the walls of the closet will be too close, so here we go! I’m removing all the stuff I just did. There’s a lonely brand new little switch box just dangling there.

This will have to be moved back to allow a landing for the new stair layout. I always use construction screws to build walls – just for this very reason. Simple to unscrew everything and use again.

The new door location is framed in place. We’ll have to ditch the pocket door because we don’t have enough space to retract the door. It’s always something.

We’ll use a 15 pane door with textured glass – just like the 1st floor bathroom door. This will let light in through the closet window.

So I think I’m finally getting everything in place – surely we won’t make any more changes here.

But these little access doors to enter the eave area kinda bugged me. Not quite the fit and finish I like.

They were made to be insulated, as the space under the roof in these areas was not insulated.

And behind that little door it looked like this. This area is unconditioned space,  The white bucket was used to catch water flowing in from the chimney area decking. The chimney had a pipe coming out the side with a piece if tin foil over the hole. Nice. We gotta fix all this.

And this lame little window too. This is a sad little room without any character. I’m feeling the demo demon grabbing hold of me.

Please someone help me. That window will need some attention, so off comes the drywall.

Of course to make this look good inside, we have to make it look good outside too. Here I’ve stripped all of the aluminum siding off the front.

We use a little cardboard mock up to visualize and we settle on a 3′ octagonal window to replace the 2′ original.

So with a little reframing and other gymnastics, we have our 3′ window in place.

And we’re working on the outside as well. This will get a stone veneer in the years to come. Stick with me, we’ll make a few more adjustments to the pointy closet – why, we might even make it pointy again.

Steep Bungalow Stairs #6

Well – it’s time to finish up the preliminary stair project. Preliminary? Why sure – you don’t think I’d finish the stairs when I have so much more to do. Remember, this has gone from a simple cosmetic upgrade to a full home reconstruction. We’ll get the stair functional and move on to the next area – we’ll start finishes as soon as I get all the structure and mechanicals updated. This will include all new wiring – plumbing and HVAC systems. Oh, and my dear wife Francia – who has never asked for a single thing has one request. A basement woman-cave with steam shower and whirlpool tub.

Yes dear…

Man, I get tired just thinking about all this stuff…sigh.

closet door frame

One of the problems with the new stairs is the lower angle clipped the closet door, making it impossible to use. The solution is to remove the door and shift the frame over to gain some clearance. Here’s the after.

office wall 1

The office wall is being reframed.

office wall 2

Since I have the space, I’m extending the closet all the way under the staircase.

closet wall

This will give me about 10 feet of floor space.

reinforced wall header

On the kitchen wall side the area where the chimney was is reinforced with a header.

stair to bathroom

The bottom of the stairs has the first floor bathroom. So to keep the design coherent, we’ll do the same at the top.

new closet door

We’ll inset the door with the same obscure glass we used for the bath.

new closet door inside

This is the new configuration of the walk in closet – looking from inside out. (Don’t worry – it will change again before it’s done)

kitchen wall

The kitchen wall will be the placement for the main appliances in a modified galley layout.

office wall

The office side after the closet door was moved.

closet crawl door

Now focusing on the closet for a while we’ll tackle whats behind the doors that access the front eaves of the house.

under eave unfinished

Behind door # 1  Yikes!

Stay tuned we’ll make something of this place yet.