Perhaps not my most spectacular post

Greetings! Fear not my fellow renovators and spectators, my infrequent posts are not a sign that I am growing weary of this nearly 10 year renovation marathon. No, indeed I’m more energized than ever to complete this adventure in my lifetime. The problem is, I have nothing wow-worthy to show you. Take this post for instance. I suggest you get comfortable, grab a beverage of your choice and be prepared for a incredibly entertaining post about…

~ Baseboards ~

Yep, the baseboard. I can’t tell you how thrilled I was that my next project on the list was putting in new baseboards after the floors were installed. I’m using 1X flat stock of poplar, 10 feet long. This is a simple squared off design, so no coping the corners, no this should be a simple install 1-2-3 done! But are we forgetting something? Anything? Well, yes – this is no mere baseboard – this is part of our ongoing art project. Add a little OCD in there and this easy project become a little more complicated.

First we size up some boards and give them a coat of primer and a couple of finish coats. It’s a lot easier to finish them on the sawhorses than on my creaky old knees.

Second, we bevel the bottom at an angle so that the base comes to a point at the front. This will make removing any wood easier.

After we cut them to size, it’s time to scribe the base. Having done this many times. I just use a pencil and position my hand to make the marks.

If you’re a little unsteady in the hand department, you can also use a scribe tool like this.

Scribing the base will show the high spots in the floor in relation to the base, so to remove the extra material, we get out a sander and sand to the line.

Now that we have the pieces scribed to the floor, we make a mark for the scarf joints on the walls that are longer than 10 feet – which is most of them.

Once we get them cut to the right length, we glue and nail the scarf joints together. The joint is cut to land on a wall stud for extra strength.

I use trim head screws to attach the baseboard to the wall through the wall studs for a tight fit. I use Ready Patch to fill the holes. I really like this stuff, but buy the smallest can you can, because it will rust in the can. That’s three ‘cans’ in the same sentence – impressive.

Everything goes slower now that the floors are partially finished. I use a drywall knife on the floor to make sure my disc sander doesn’t have an accidental meeting with the floor.

Once the scarf joint is sanded it is primed and given a couple coats of paint.

So after several hours crawling around on the floor like a worm, we get to see the fruits of our labor. We still have filling and sanding to do. Now no one will see this unless they drink too much or I fall asleep while renovating this place – but then my OCD can take a break.

While I was wrestling with the baseboard, these two guys showed up.

And delivered my new gas range to my imaginary kitchen – boy, I can almost smell the bacon now.

And once the baseboards were in I started to fiddle with the TV lift and connections. I’ve bolted on a 32″ TV to work out the bugs before I put the 55″ one in that belongs there.

So there you have it – another fascinating glimpse into the  MisAdventures world of Remodeling.

I hope everyone is having a safe and happy weekend!

 

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January Update just some stair stuff

Greetings for the New Year! I’m just getting back to the MisAdventures project after our busy Holiday season. Since I have a real job and have a retail business, it’s taken awhile to get back over here and get to work. I hope everyone made a NewYear’s resolution – and you haven’t broken it yet. My resolution is to get moved into this place in 2018 – so fingers crossed that will happen. Now were was I? Oh, yes the header says something about stairs. Yes, that’s it!

But we’ll start with the master bath and the stereo speaker is added to the ceiling. This will be linked to the Bluetooth AV system so music can be streamed from my wife’s phone while see lounges in the bathroom.

We left the newly constructed staircase like this. (That was in 2013) I stopped with the addition of the skirt boards on either side and the risers cut and fastened. Time for some new stair treads.

The risers are 3/4″ poplar the three lower steps extend past the left hand wall.

The 1st tread in place. These are 1″ solid white oak treads. I looked for a local supplier, but found only one here and pretty expensive. I found a fabricator not far away in Tennessee that made them for half the locally quoted price. The Blackford & Son web site is here: http://www.hardwoodstairtreads.com/

I picked up this tread tool at Home Depot to make measuring the treads more accurate.

The tool consists of two plastic end pieces that clamp to a piece of 1X3 lumber. You clamp the end pieces tight against the skirt boards and the riser and you have an accurate template.

Place the template against the riser (these are the longer ones in the mudroom). Mark the ends of the template and cut. Simple and fool proof.

Three cut and 12 more to go. These are only placed in position. They will be removed and stained by the flooring guys before final installation. I wish I would have had this tool to cut my risers. It would have been more accurate and I wouldn’t have to caulk the riser/skirtboard joint. Live and learn.

The last three steps require a little more cutting. I ordered three treads with left hand returns to fit the exposed end treads.

The left hand returns have a finished lip that extends over the side of the stair. This has to be field cut and fitted to the return trim on the wall.

The treads are marked and cut to fit. The finish and quality of the treads was very good.

So that brings us up to date. Right now we’re in the middle of a snow ‘event’ with temps dropping from 60 degrees this past Wednesday to a -6 coming mid-week. Ah, life in the Midwest.

Stay warm and I’ll see you soon.

 

A quick update

Greetings fellow renovators and spectators! Sorry for the delay in posting. I haven’t given up the ghost, or finished the MisAdventures project – just yet. As I have a real job (besides doodling around here). I’ve had projects for the last few months that have taken up some of my sawdust making time. So I’ll just post a couple photos of an art display project that I haven’t had time to finish.

My original idea of renovating this house was to have a place to display my collection of art and antiques. So this project is to get this up on the wall. This is a large wood and gesso Tang Style horse that was made in the 1940’s for export. It is my Chinese Zodiac sign and was the second antique I ever purchased when I was 17 years old – that was 46 years ago.

So the plan is to get this old horse to stay way up there where my cardboard cutout now resides. When I have time, with a little experimentation and some construction, we’ll have him hanging around. It will be nice to have this old horse displayed for the first time in nearly half a century.

I’ll be back here full time soon to finish up the inside of this now nearly 9 year project.

What’s that? 46 years to display an antique, 9 years to renovate a home – perhaps I’m a little slow – but then again, that’s all relative. Stick around.

 

 

The Pointy Closet #3 where we are as of today

Here is the final post for the pesky pointy closet. As I write this, I’m still working on this space. The final floors will go in soon on the second floor, so all is ready for this final step. So let’s finish this up, shall we?

We left off from post #2 looking like this. Well, it’s pointy enough, but this is a vintage house built in 1935. Seems like it needs a little more character than just drywall everywhere.

So since I have several rooms with wood on the ceiling and walls, let’s panel the front wall with a little board and batten. We’ll cover the surface with plywood and make it look and feel authentic. OK.

Once the front wall is done, we might as well do the back wall as well….and what the heck…

Let’s just panel the whole room. This will give it a little more of the vintage feel – and will take a couple more weeks to get to this point.

And we just keep covering the wall/ceiling with 1/4″ plywood and rabbeted wood battens. I added a light block to the front wall and a little wall sconce above the window.

In my mocked up design I’m planing to add a shelf along each side over the ‘wings’ that protrude out from the sides of the closet. I contemplated a painted shelf, or some type of wood. I didn’t want to spend a lot of money on the shelves. They’re 10′ long on each side.

So I went to Menard’s and looked through the lumber section for some ideas. I came up with some cedar that I thought would work, but it wasn’t wide enough.

So I went through the whole stack and found 2 pieces of 1X10’s and 2 pieces of 1X6 that were nearly a perfect match. I glued them up and sanded then down and they look pretty good. You can see the seam running down the middle.

A test fit to see if the shelves are the right width. I made these 12″ wide. The closet is not very practical, so we’re going to make it as useful as possible. I thought the shelves would be slightly helpful.

Having the shelves test fit out of the way, we can add a little finish to the sanded shelves. A mixture of boiled linseed oil, varnish and mineral spirits give the grain a little depth before the final finishes go on.

While the shelves are being finished, the board and batten details are added to the lower sections of the closet. We had to make a little do-dad detour around the vent as well.

The finishing is going on. A mixture of 50/50 latex paint and water. This is put on to allow the grain to slightly show through.

A few coats of wipe-on polyurethane and we have the shelves ready to go in. Now we just have to finish the walls.

The white washed walls are finished. The openings on either side of the wing area will get fitted drawers and shelves – something I haven’t made yet.

All of the whitewash is on the ceiling/walls. So now we’re going to add a little color.

And what would be better than a nice coat of Tiffany Blue.

The first coats go on to give the room a little color.

All of the surfaces get a good sanding to 220. This lets some of the grain show through.

This is why I paneled the whole room. The wood panel grain showing through is the vintage feel I was looking for in this pointy little closet.

The high gloss finish on the shelves enhance the grain of the cedar. Also the bottom of the shelves are recessed. I plan on using blocks of cedar that are removable that can be recharged with cedar oil to make this a cedar closet.

As usual, I looked for a long time to find this little light fixture. I thought it had a vintage, almost Scandinavian design. It has a frosted glass shade which I also like. I’m thinking this light will be used as a night light when everything is finished. Also, this blue was antiqued and over-glazed several times to give it a texture of a wall that had been painted many times over the years.

Six foot closet rods are added between the wings for hanging space.

One on either side will give us 12′ of usable hanging space.

8 coats of satin Varathane clear coating is needed to get a uniform sheen, with sanding between coats and finishing out at 400 grit. Does it take time? Yep, but that’s what this art project is all about. I modified the two pendant lights to make them fit the space.

So that brings the pointy closet up to date. I’m waiting for the floor guy to come back and finish installing the floors. And to make this space even more impractical all of the floors on the second floor are white.

Stay tuned, no telling what’s going to happen next.

 

The Pointy Closet #2

The second chapter of the pointy closet. We have the new 3′ octagonal window in place, so now we can work on widening the room. First we open up the walls and see what we’ve got to work with. This side of the closet is open to the outside. It was insulated but you can see daylight peeking through – we’ll add 18″ on this side.

The other side now opens into the new sun room addition. I’ve moved the wall out 18″ on this side as well and decked the floor.

In my last post I showed you this area under the eaves.

Sparing you the journey of weeks of work, this is the old crawl space area with the brick chimney now. Everything is repaired and an insulated wall has been added. Unfaced fiberglass in the roof rafters are held in place with webbing. Blown in insulation is added behind the knee wall as well.

I’ve enlarged the floor to 8′ 6″ wide and insulated the short walls with fiberglass and foil foamboard insulation.

But the demo demon was just too strong and out comes the chopped off ceiling and side walls. Now I can add some more insulation and some character too.

Removing the drywall allowed me to move the collar ties up to the top. I could do this safely because the new sunroom structure supports this closet wall. Rafters were sistered on the side of the existing roof structure to level the wall surfaces.

The under eave storage areas get a layer of foil faced foam insulation. I am figuring out the door opening areas that will access the storage room. Lots of angles and figuring to do.

Once the walls are insulated, the walls get 5/8″ firecode drywall over the foam board. The ‘wings’ on the side walls will be used to attach closet rods.

A coat of drywall compound and tape is used to seal the drywall. The front wall gets unfaced fiberglass. All electrical is reworked and in place.

A layer of foil faced foam board is added and tape sealed to reduce air infiltration on the front wall.

Drywall is added to the front wall.

Extra drywall gymnastics are used to get the odd angles covered outside the closet entrance.

The closet entrance is taped and surfaced. Still a lot to do out here.

The under eave areas are drywalled and finished. Wiring and ventilation is also in place.

And the other side has a finished out storage area as well.

A pair of 6 panel wood doors are cut to fit the new eave openings.

One day I hope to find some use for the bottom door parts.

The door hinges are set to route the door as well as the casing.

The hinge jig makes a perfect mortise for the hinge.

The hinges are fitted to the casing and the door.

The door casing is installed and fitted.

Each door swings in to the tall wall.

The other side is framed as well for the door. Plywood flooring is added over the existing subfloor. This will have a finished oak floor over the top.

Both doors are installed for both under eave storage areas.

Working on the design of the closet layout. The pendant lights will need mounting blocks and some type of shelving will be used over the closet rod wings.

The closet entrance gets drywalled as well.

The window jamb pieces are cut to size.

The octagonal window jamb is placed in a jig that helps hold the pieces in place while they are glued and nailed.

I built two of these jambs, as the sunroom will also have an identical window.

The casing is also fabricated.

So we are on our way to getting the pointy closet ‘pointy’ again. Stick around somethings bound to change.

 

 

OK, Kitchen – I Need A Kitchen. Suggestions?

Now that the floors are in and finished with 2 coats of clear. We need to get on with designing a kitchen for the space. I have a pretty good idea in my mind’s eye. But what looks good upstairs might not work so well in reality. So I’ll lay out my plans and you can all chime in on what, when, how. If you’re a cook, all the better – I need your insight. I’m not the best of cooks, but I do make one mean scratch made Cream Puff. I’ll make you some if I ever get this place done. So let’s get on with it, shall we?

Here’s the space as it sits today. The water supply and drains are in place for the island. The bucket is full of electric for the dishwasher, garbage disposal and receptacles as well as controls for the ceiling speakers.

Now most of you probably draw out your designs or use sketchup or some other fancy visualization 3-D whoop whoop software. But down here in southern Indiana we use a little more primitive technology. OK, work with me now – the door is the refrigerator. Those half sawn doors with the cardboard flap – that’s the stove. Squint real hard – can you see the shiny new kitchen?

OK, maybe not – here’s a reverse angle. The 2 legged table is cabinets with drawers. The white slab of cardboard above is a cabinet for a toaster oven and microwave. An island runs down the middle.

I’m sure by now you can almost smell the bacon frying. The shelf on the left will be lowered a little – to hold cooking oils and salt and pepper stuff I suppose. The right hand shelf  is for plates and bowls so they’re handy when I make my fried baloney sandwiches. A prep sink will be to the right of the stove so I can wash off my food when it falls on the floor.

The range hood has a 8″ duct that goes straight up through the roof. I’m working on adding an automatic make up air system to replace the air in the building when this thing is turned on high. Didn’t think about it until now. Most building codes require a make up air system if the range hood is rated over 400 CFM – I have a KOBE hood that’s rated at 840CFM on high.

And the space between the sunroom and living room is a coffee / wine bar. Humm.. 3 sinks in one room – maybe I should have thought this through a little more. But the plumbing is there and the sinks and faucets are bought. This will have a small sink with a wine refrigerator below on the right. Above are a couple of open glass shelves and the rest is cabinets for pantry items. The thing is – I don’t drink wine or coffee. Maybe I better get a beverage center so I can chill my Diet Coke.

The Drawings

So after I built the mock up I did make some drawings. Look professional? Just a little bit? OK, well you’re right they’re not. I used my trusty Microsoft Publisher from Office 2000 to make the scaled drawings. I guess you’d call that ‘Old School’?

I plan on making the island on two levels. The sink side is 36″ and the lower side is 30″. That’s a standard table height. My wife is only 5’2″ and I thought the lower height would make it easier if she ever decided to cook something. The lower level can also be used as a table with regular height dining chairs if we needed more table space. I thought about exdending the end of the counter so I could get a couple of stools under for a place to eat.

The layout is made so you don’t have to walk through the working spaces to get to other rooms in the house. The back mudroom entrance allows you to go to the sunroom and living room by walking straight ahead, or going to the two offices, bathroom and upstairs by turning left.

So that’s my plan. I’d appreciate all of you creative people’s ideas. Bonus points if you know how to cook.

 

 

Hardwood floors going in

As I noted in my last post, the good stuff is going in. After 8 years of sawdust and open walls, things will start to come together. The good thing is I know that all of the systems and mechanics are brand new and hopefully will last another 80+ years.

We left off here. The 2 1/2″ white oak floors are being installed. I contracted this project out – mainly due to time. I’m working on the upstairs to try and finish this year. Wide white oak floors go up there, and I have a lot to do. Besides, I know these will be done on a level better than I could do.

Stained and with 2 coats of clear, it’s time for me to get my baseboard cap on and put in some trim.

This is the kitchen area to be. The bucket holds all of the electric and controls for the in ceiling speakers. A central island will be 14′ long on two levels. The  space is 40′ long from the back door to the sunroom wall.

I’ve got to finish the fireplace install and a final coat of paint on the fireplace – and baseboard trim and we’re almost finished in this room.

I put porcelain tile down at the two entrances next to the wood floors. I wanted to keep water off of the floors to make the finish last a little longer.

So here is a picture of my sock feet this morning, walking on my newly finished floors. So much more to do, but we’re headed in the right direction.

Stick around, something’s bound to happen.