Working on the Old House #2

As we are all trying our best to get through this challenge, I hope each of you is safe and healthy. And since we are all staying close to home – you might as well spend a little of your free time with me – looking at an old home. We will continue….

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We started with this fine example of Early Crack House architecture, circa 1920. Here I’ve removed the vinyl siding and the soffit banding covering the gable above the aluminum door and windows.

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The plan is to put this back to an open porch as it was originally. It will not only cost less to renovate, but will also keep with the character of the house. Since we’ve secured the front door we can remove the offending elements. (Shown on the ground to the left).

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The best way to get rid of unwanted building materials is to set them out on the curb and wait. These were picked up by a couple of scrappers in less than 5 minutes.

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So with the porch opened up and the gable covering removed, we can see what we have to work with. And right here we have asbestos panels. The vertical panels were attached to the building with wood battens covering the panel joints. The appearance boards over the opening are solid, but need some attention as well.

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The best course of action was to leave the original asbestos panels in place. It would cause more problems to remove the panels that were solid and well attached. So here I’ve covered the gable with sheet PVC with solid PVC trim.

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I recreated the original trim design on the gable. All PVC, it will be much more durable (and safer) fully encapsulating the asbestos panels. The PVC header trim will also not rot at the attachment point of the pillars, where absorbed water in the concrete could be a maintenance problem.

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Now that we have an open porch to work in, we can add a storm door and work on the severely weathered original clapboards. Exterior trim was also fabricated to cover the original 8′ door opening.

And on we go – we haven’t spent a lot of money and it is starting to look a little respectable.

Stay safe and I’ll see you again soon.

So it’s time to pester you some more

My last blog post was October 21 of last year.

Some of you must have thought – “Well, that’s it for the old geezer- he won’t be back” and surprisingly, you would have been mistaken. I will admit 2019 was not a stellar year in the home renovating or health department. I did minimal work on my project last year because the hospital industrial complex missed me and my money. I did several small projects, but nothing that was show & tell worthy.  I did however, work on my old house –  which you will see seems more like an abandoned and sad little place. It’s a little one bath home that was built in 1920 that had seen better days – much better days. My brother lived here before me and ‘insisted’ I give up apartment life and live the life in luxury and buy this place from him. And I thought he liked me…but we’ll fix it up a little.

So until the weather warms up and I can get back to renovating the MisAdventures project, I’ll keep the blog alive with recent and current updates on turning this old house into a comfortable little place for a new family. It won’t be the no expense spared nonsense like the MisAdventures project, but we’ll make in nice.

We’ll  start with this.

Yes – my old home – for some reason, my wife likes the new one better. Here I’ve started taking the vinyl siding off the front. The siding guys thought a contrasting band of soffit would make a nice accent across the front, above the windows. It did not. Oh, and I’ve already removed the shower-curtain curtains that added just the right touch to the aluminum windowed porch. It had a 1980’s crack house kinda vibe. But we’ll see what becomes of this place. My neighbors will thank me.

See you soon…I promise.

Curt