A Mid-April Update

Greetings fellow renovators! Boy. look at the time! The 1st quarter of the year is over and the deadline to move in this 9 year renovation is closing in. I still think it will happen in 2018 – but it might be a squeaker. No major progress to report, as my real job has kept me from devoting full time here, but that should change soon. So here is a Mid- April update.

I finally got the TV mounted in the Sunroom. A 55″ OLED from Samsung. I needed the brighter picture quality due to all the windows in this room. Fortunately this thing fits in the cabinet I built. It’s retractable so I can add a piece of art behind this so I don’t have a black rectangle staring at me every day.

Repairing of small dents and painting trim in the stair area. It had some damage from the flooring guys going through here to get to the second floor. Trim is Impervo White and wall color is BM Sterling.The textured glass bathroom door allows light into this area.

My office area trim is also getting the final paint coats. I still have to cut the door bottoms off since adding the new 3/4″ oak floors.

I designed this place with lots of large windows. The paneled walls help add shadow and dimension to the mostly white and light color rooms. The black chalkboard paint above will have a TV mounted. The wall eliminates the ‘black rectangle’ I’m not fond of.

My wife has already claimed the bookshelf windows for her orchids. Even in April, there’s still snow on the ground some days.

In a previous post I was contemplating getting this old 4′ wood horse up on the wall. I made a test bracket to see if it would work visually. I was OK with it, but didn’t like the Victorian look of the cast iron brackets. A little too fancy for the style of the room I thought.

So I found a pair of wood corbels and made a few adjustments.

Painted it the same wall color, but finished with a waterbase clear finish.

I made the bracket wide enough so that it could be attached to three wall studs. The 5″ deck screws made for a very secure mount.

I thought the design of the brackets mirrored the sconces in shape. They have a more Craftsman look, which I think complements the ornate elements in the room.

Having finished that project, it’s time to get the second floor installed. This is 6″ wide rustic white oak.

Because I’m on a time crunch, I also hired this job out. This floor will have unfilled cracks like the Scandinavian floors I have seen. The job goes fast over my new 1/2″ plywood floor overlay.

The stair moldings create the smooth transition to the steps. I have old French iron balcony panels I’ll have to figure out a way to mount them.

Of course the floor guy didn’t think I would want the under eave closet spaces finished out the same way. He was wrong. We used 5″ engineered white oak flooring in here. You can’t really tell the width difference, and besides this will be covered with countless storage boxes when my wife gets done with the space. I’ll crawl in here later and add baseboards.

The white washed oil finish is on. It’s a matte finish with gaps in the boards – it drives me crazy and I want to fill them, but it’s authentic to the ones my wife likes, so the cracks and gaps will stay – for now.

The soft finish has a nice look. The gaps no, but the matte finish is a nice look for our bedroom and closet.

A while back I posted about the kitchen design. Many of you had wonderful suggestions and some have been incorporated in the design. I told my wife one day we’ll get some wood cabinets, but we’ll use the cardboard ones for now.

This mock-up has been very useful and several changes have been made as my wife can see exactly how the work space will feel.

Locations of pot and pan storage, waster and recycling pull outs and the shelf size and placement were finalized for the construction of the cabinets and counters.

Being an art dealer, some things take priority over even finishing the kitchen. The life size oil painting called Victorian Tea is in it’s final hanging place after having it in storage for 29 years.

As well as an oil painting of a local historic landmark building by Kentucky artist Harry Davis.

So there’s an update. Some flooring, some horseplay and a couple of paintings. Here’s wishing everyone a very Happy Spring.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Hardwood floors going in

As I noted in my last post, the good stuff is going in. After 8 years of sawdust and open walls, things will start to come together. The good thing is I know that all of the systems and mechanics are brand new and hopefully will last another 80+ years.

We left off here. The 2 1/2″ white oak floors are being installed. I contracted this project out – mainly due to time. I’m working on the upstairs to try and finish this year. Wide white oak floors go up there, and I have a lot to do. Besides, I know these will be done on a level better than I could do.

Stained and with 2 coats of clear, it’s time for me to get my baseboard cap on and put in some trim.

This is the kitchen area to be. The bucket holds all of the electric and controls for the in ceiling speakers. A central island will be 14′ long on two levels. The  space is 40′ long from the back door to the sunroom wall.

I’ve got to finish the fireplace install and a final coat of paint on the fireplace – and baseboard trim and we’re almost finished in this room.

I put porcelain tile down at the two entrances next to the wood floors. I wanted to keep water off of the floors to make the finish last a little longer.

So here is a picture of my sock feet this morning, walking on my newly finished floors. So much more to do, but we’re headed in the right direction.

Stick around, something’s bound to happen.

August Notes – what’s been happening

Greetings my fellow renovators and particular handy people. Well, another month has past and it’s time for an update. The posts will come more frequently and not as long after this one because fancy stuff will start to happen. Or I hope so.

We’ll start in the small 2nd floor master bedroom. It’s not a huge room, and that’s fine by me. I wanted a smaller cozier place to lay my weary head. But no time for rest now, we’ve got to get busy.  The textured ceiling is finally removed. This was a messy, no fun procedure.  I’ve added a wood banding at the ceiling wall junction and painted the walls BM Sterling gray.The ceiling was difficult because most of the intersecting joints were cracked. I removed the paper tape in all of the corners and added a composite flexible corner tape called StraitFlex    I added another wood banding to create a beam appearance. I also added some upright pieces to add a little detail. The wood beam on the back wall is a support beam for the steel I beam that is hiding behind my new wood banding. We’ll make pilaster covers for those.After a lot of fiddling and drywall mud, I finally have the ceiling and corners where I want them. So on goes a couple coats of ceiling white. At this point I wasn’t feeling the gray wall intersection with the angled ceiling. Something about it said  “not finished’. Adding trim would be a nightmare with all of the angles and layout of the room. So while we ponder that great question, we might as well put some finish on the wood window casing. Most of the other window trim in the house is made with poplar for solid paint. This room will have a little more rustic feel, so knotty pine was used. Here I’m adding a wash coat. Once I put on the paint, I give it a light sand and then a couple coats of Varathane water based clear coating. The waterbase coating won’t yellow over time like polyurethanes will. And when I finished that I decided to paint the walls the same color as the ceiling. So that solved the weird angle paint dilemma. This is an all white room, with a white floor as well. We used white so much because I have a lot of art and that will add some color to our spaces. The pocket doors are ready to be painted and installed. I skip over much of this door painting exercise, but it took a very long time to paint and finish the two pocket doors for the bathroom and bedroom, and I still have another one to paint for the closet.

The doors have textured glass for privacy, yet it allows light through to brighten the space. All of the glass doors are like this.

Now we hop down to the 1st floor and get everything out for the new oak floors. It’s not been this clean since 2009. I’m still working on the direct vent fireplace, we’ll get that sorted out before winter.

It’s kinda nice to be able to walk in through the house without tripping over something.

Here’s one pile of white oak for the 1st floor.

And here’s the other pile that’s needed to finish the 1st floor. This is 2 1/4″ 3/4″ white oak.

As much as I would have liked to lay these floors, I contracted it out to a very skilled installer. Here is the start looking from the living room into the kitchen area. He’ll be here a couple of weeks on the first floor, and again for the second floor. It would take me months to do this.

Back upstairs we find a problem. The pocket door was nice and flush to the door casing when closed, but when pushed back into the pocket, the bottom was back about 1″. Bad news. That meant the track inside the pocket was not level. The front was, but not the back. So we cut some holes in our new drywall and make some adjustments. The hole allowed me to lower the back of the track to make everything level. So I’ve paid for my mistake.

So we make a new drywall patch and screw it in place. We tape and mud and feather it out. Move along, nothing to see here. And the door is flush to the casings when open and closed. Meanwhile, while my door drama is unfolding on the second floor, the hard wood guys are busy at work laying the floors in the sunroom.

You might recall in my last post this photo of the access door that is in the master bedroom. The 2nd floor HVAC unit is behind this area. I wasn’t feeling this ill fitting door, so I had some time to think of a solution.

So the solution was to make a panel on the opposite wall to mirror the new door I’ll make for the opening. Here I’ve applied the wood directly to the drywall. The panel was meant to fit next to the post cover I made to hide the support beam.

On the door side, I made a new door and a pilaster cover to match the other side. There is no support beam here, so it’s just for show to match. I used euro hinges that are removable, so if major service is needed the door can be removed all together in seconds. I painted the door the same paint color as the wall. I didn’t add any door hardware, as It’s easy to open. The gap at the bottom will disappear when the new floor goes in.  And the dummy door is painted as well so everything matches.

So after 8 years this month, things are finally going back together. I’ve got to get the appliances ordered so I can make a final design of the kitchen. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

Hang in there – something’s bound to happen.