About curt

Art Dealer and business owner by day - fanatic renovator the rest of the time. Endlessly working on a 1930 home in southern Indiana.

Today I realized this is not a renovation – it’s an art project.

My wife has always called this the “hobby house”, but I realized this week it’s really an art project. Take for example this picture. These are deck screws that are used to fasten a 1/2″ plywood overlay on the original floors.
   I Took a look at all of the first floor, which is done the same way and they’re all lined up too. When will I learn the color outside of the lines?

Mudroom Details – it’s the little things

Greetings and salutations my fellow renovators. Sorry for the late posting, it’s just that the things I’m working on are not so photogenic. I did get around to finishing up most of the mudroom.

These are the three steps that go from the mudroom into the kitchen. You can see the old brick foundation and original floor framing members. I have a toe kick installed for a HVAC vent.

Adding the risers and cut out the vent opening. This is a 2 1/2″ X 14″ toe kick vent.

The door to the right goes to the woman cave. The textured glass lets more light in the stairwell. It matches all the other glass doors.Up the steps to the kitchen you see that pesky shoe storage bench and coat hooks.

I am obsessed with little details. I like everything to be precise and finished. Here I milled small trim pieces to finish off the tile edges. The thin strip under the window ledge is made from of PVC, to make sure there’s no water damage from a wet counter top.

Instead of getting an expensive plugmold power strip. I cut a piece of wood at an angle and used this power strip. At 17.00 it’s a lot cheaper.

The Leland Single Handle faucet works well.  The small soap pump and the electronic garbage disposal switch has an auto turn off after 20 seconds.

I used very simple polished chrome knobs on all of the cabinets. These were 2.80 at Menards.

So there you have it – a nearly finished mud room. Sure I started building it in 2010, but hey, a guy has to take his time.

I promise better posts in the future. We’re just getting started.

 

OK, Now I’m in the Mudroom

How about this? Two posts in one day? Well,this one will get me updated to real time – as in this morning. I was happily painting cabinet doors at 3:30am today, and got most of the Mudroom projects completed – so why not get this post out of the way.

One item added was a rail and coat hooks above the shoe storage bench.

We left the mudroom like this for the past few years. Looks like we need to make some cabinet doors.

First things first. We have to clean this place up! It’s a little tricky, so I decided to make another half-a**ed scaffold. No issue with falling off and being wheelchair bound this time. It was the only way to get to the tops of the cabinets and window without risking breaking the granite counters.

I used a small scale white subway tile for the back splash.

The left side has an electrical feed for a receptacle. This whole circuit is on a gfci line as required by code.

I used a light silver grout to match the lighter tones of the granite.

I cut an angled block to mount the 4 socket receptacle – the angle makes it easy to plug in appliances or whatever. I didn’t like those exposed screws used to mount the power strip.

So I made a couple of covers that fit over the mounting tabs to make it look more built in.

Now we get out the stile and rail router bits to make the cabinet doors.

The first fitting of the doors. I made them inset, like the rest of the cabinets I’ve made. All of the trim around the tile and windows was fabricated and finished. The cabinet doors are 40″ tall, so they looked a little bland.

So I took some inspiration from the original cabinet doors that flank the living room fireplace. I wanted to avoid glass doors in the mudroom, as I didn’t want to see boxes of laundry detergent every time I walked in the room.

So I made a mock up of the same design to see if it would work as an overlay. OK

While I was at it I made a pair of plain shaker doors for the sink base cabinet.

So I painted the doors and got them back on their hinges by 8:00am this morning.

I need some doorknobs. Hang in there – more to come. But not today.

 

The Kitchen – Yes, I’m Still in The Kitchen

Well, I’m still fiddling in the kitchen – this is the last post in here until the floor is installed. So let’s get this post out of the way. We’ll move to the mudroom next and finish those cabinets that were built several years ago.

First up is finding an old picture light and painting it black. Being in the art business, I have lots of picture lights laying around. But most are just too pretty for this space. I’m using an old trade in and painted it black. I’ll add a ledge and light switch somewhere on the frame.

But right now we have to finish the trim and paint in this space.

Above the shoe bench and to the right of the storage space I added a deep shelf. I plan to use this to hold a big piece of Italian majolica.

Like this example I have in my gallery. This one in particular if no one takes it home first. It’s 24″ tall and just fits the space…how did that happen?

Now to take care of some things that were bugging me about the design. I made this pilaster / wall cap stepped back above the wainscotting. I wanted a little more room visually, so I thought this would work. Looks dumb.

So grab a scrap piece of wood and carefully cut out the profile.

And fine tune it to fit the column. I feel better now.

But not that much better

I painted the whole kitchen with  SW Egret White. It’s the same wall color as the sunroom walls are painted.  I painted two coats on all the wall trim, panels and battens. Sanded that and then coated everything with two coats of Varathane satin finish. I use a small brush, as it gives it a more authentic finish than using a roller – It took a long time. But now, I’m not feeling it. The paint has a tinge of pink I think.

So I had to make a test patch to see if I could live with the slightly pink color – pastels are in right now, right?

I couldn’t

So here you see me with my 2 1/2″ brush doing to whole thing over – twice.This is a BM custom white in a pearl finish. The custom color is actually a match of Valspar ceiling white – which I painted the first floor bathroom and mudroom. Why I didn’t do it here – I’m not sure, but it was a color mistake that cost me about 20 hours.

I feel better and I’m ready to move on. Mudroom’s next – so stick around..

 

Still Hanging in the Kitchen – Shoe Storage

My original plans were to breeze through the kitchen area and march right upstairs to get this place done. But sometimes my intentions and my “what if” thought process do battle – and usually the thought process wins.

Like This Time

The main wall is paneled and painted and the clear coats are on – great. But down at the end where the mud room is I have a little alcove area when you come up three steps to enter into the kitchen.Here’s that space a long time ago.The little alcove area is about 12″ deep. My original intention was to put a little table there and call it a day. But then I thought “What will I do with my wife’s gazillion shoes?” I have two pair – my lucky ones you have already seen and one other pair. But my wife on the other hand has ‘countless’ numbers of shoes that all look the same to me and pile up at the back door. We’ve got to find a way to hide some of them.

OK

We’ll think about what we’ll do about the shoe problem, but first I’ll finish this storage area that is 3’X3’X8′. This space is over the basement stairs. I’ll make a pantry or something out of it. First we gotta finish the drywall and paint.

Done – and the casing is added around the opening. I intend to make a pair of doors for this.

After a couple days of research and head scratching, I came up  with this idea. A shoe storage bench. I found the pivoting shoe caddy brackets at Lee Valley Tools. This thing was hard to get right. The sides are 3/4″ plywood and the other pieces are 1/2″ plywood. Stuff I had laying around already. I’ve made up the basic carcass – and my shoes fit. (That’s my other pair).

I then made a front face frame from 3/4″ poplar and an inset of 1/2″ plywood.

The fitting is pretty finicky, but I got it to work. That’s another pair of pivot hinges- just in case I messed up the first pair. They’re made from ABS plastic – I wanted something more substantial, but couldn’t find anything. I thought if these broke I could use the second pair as a pattern and make a set out of wood.

My idea was to incorporate this into a bench. You can sit and take your shoes off and have a place to put them.

I made this so that it can be removed for the hardwood floor to be installed. You never know, I might want that table back as I originally intended.A little more adjustments and it works as intended. It holds 18 pairs of shoes. I hope she doesn’t need any more than that at the back door.

Now we’ll take a break and work on the chalkboard. Here’s the frame I made from an old 2X4 that was removed during renovation. I looked around for a piece of real slate to use, but couldn’t find any.

So I went out to the garage and cut a piece of cement board and gave it a few coats of chalkboard paint.

I’ll add a little picture light and a chalk ledge for this when we get closer to the finish.

Since I now had a can of chalkboard paint, I thought I might as well make this whole wall a chalkboard as well. At least I can doodle while the bread’s in the oven.

And I added another chalkboard painted area above the bench. We’ll just keep going – and hope the “What if” thoughts stay away until we get upstairs.

Hang in there, we’ll get to the pretty parts one day.

 

 

 

Another Kitchen Wall – it’s even more complicated

As we continue to work our way towards finishing the walls in the kitchen – it’s time to paint something!

I’m using the same paint as the sunroom walls. Sherwin Williams Egret White. The two offices on this floor have color on the walls, but the main living rooms are all done in a very neutral pallet – that’s because I have a lot of art that goes in these spaces and I like the walls that don’t get art to have a tone on tone texture. I’m trying to let shadow lines not color add the detail. I hope this works out.

The paneled wall gets two coats of the color paint and then two coats of water based Varathane polyurethane in a satin finish. The water base is used as it doesn’t yellow over time. The clear coat changes the color and texture, giving the walls a very smooth finish.

Of course, the plants are still there, but they’ll move outside soon – probably as soon as I finish the room.

As I work my way around the kitchen walls I have run into a legacy problem.

When I started the first floor bathroom renovation, I worked hours and hours to try and straighten out the common wall with the kitchen and first floor bathroom.

It looked like this after I noodled and fiddled and made it workable on the inside. I built the recessed medicine cabinet with a mirror for the back – I didn’t want a stray nail or screw to come through from the other side.

This is the other side of that wall. My plan was to add a half wall of panel and finish the upper section with paint. Once I got the banding temporarily in place I realized the wall was pretty wonky. Time for plan ‘B’.

I decided to build the wall in one piece instead of attaching each individual piece. This will give me a straighter finished wall – I hope. I used Kreg screws and glue to attach the top and bottom bands as well as the three cross pieces. I then cut glued and nailed the plywood panels in place.

The panel is 54″ tall and a little over 8′ long. The cutouts for the light switches and framing around the air vent are in place. The recessed TV mount is fully articulated and wired.

The cutout for the receptacle is in and the whole assembly is polyurethane glued in place. Screws were used to attach the banding and braces in place to apply pressure to the wall. Sections of the wall were a no-go for nails or screws because of vent pipes and that recessed medicine cabinet.

And now I have to figure out this storage area that is above the basement stairs. Another puzzle to figure out.This space is 34″ deep and 36″ tall and 8′ long.

The top of the wall is painted a flat black enamel. This will help the TV blend in to the space – hopefully. This section is painted now so the pre-painted wood banding that goes around this area can be installed for a clean look.

Hang in there – something will happen, as soon as I figure this out.