Working on the Old House #2

As we are all trying our best to get through this challenge, I hope each of you is safe and healthy. And since we are all staying close to home – you might as well spend a little of your free time with me – looking at an old home. We will continue….

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We started with this fine example of Early Crack House architecture, circa 1920. Here I’ve removed the vinyl siding and the soffit banding covering the gable above the aluminum door and windows.

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The plan is to put this back to an open porch as it was originally. It will not only cost less to renovate, but will also keep with the character of the house. Since we’ve secured the front door we can remove the offending elements. (Shown on the ground to the left).

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The best way to get rid of unwanted building materials is to set them out on the curb and wait. These were picked up by a couple of scrappers in less than 5 minutes.

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So with the porch opened up and the gable covering removed, we can see what we have to work with. And right here we have asbestos panels. The vertical panels were attached to the building with wood battens covering the panel joints. The appearance boards over the opening are solid, but need some attention as well.

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The best course of action was to leave the original asbestos panels in place. It would cause more problems to remove the panels that were solid and well attached. So here I’ve covered the gable with sheet PVC with solid PVC trim.

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I recreated the original trim design on the gable. All PVC, it will be much more durable (and safer) fully encapsulating the asbestos panels. The PVC header trim will also not rot at the attachment point of the pillars, where absorbed water in the concrete could be a maintenance problem.

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Now that we have an open porch to work in, we can add a storm door and work on the severely weathered original clapboards. Exterior trim was also fabricated to cover the original 8′ door opening.

And on we go – we haven’t spent a lot of money and it is starting to look a little respectable.

Stay safe and I’ll see you again soon.

14 thoughts on “Working on the Old House #2

    • Thanks Ms D. Well, if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, sounds like a duck…it’s probably a duck. Take care.

    • Yes – it’s a placeholder post of my old house I’m working on until I the weather is better and I can get back on the Misadventures project. As soon as this virus thing goes away. I’ll be back.

    • You think? I know what you mean. I think someone put those up in the 1940’s. I thought it would look better bringing it back to original – and much less expensive to boot. Stay safe.

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