Sunroom Window Trimming

Now that we are back on the ground we can trim out the big windows in sunroom. We have 7 in here and all will get the same design treatment – except the two on the end wall that will be wrapped with bookcases.

1 jamb jointFirst we rip the jamb stock to size – just a little wider than the surrounding drywall. These will be painted, so I’m using poplar – a very good wood for projects like this because of it’s easy workability and tight grain to make that Oh-so-smooth finish. You see that I have a routed joint – it will make your life so much easier when doing window jambs, as it keeps the joint perpendicular.

2 router spacerI always make as many jigs or templates to make the job go quickly. If you have more than a couple of anything – this is the best way to speed things up. Here I have a spacer that is exactly the width of the router base to the straight edge jig.

3 router jigHere’s a picture of a jig setup for routing the bookcase around the windows – but it’s the same idea. The template rests against the straight edge jig and is lined up with the marks where you want the joint to be. I’ll get into detail in the next couple of posts.

4 stool cutI assemble the three sides of the jamb – the top and sides. So you have a ‘U’ shaped piece glued and nailed together. I then make the stool – the sill of the window. I shim this at both sides of the window and set the ‘U’ on top.

5 loose stoolI shim and nail the ‘U’ in place and add the side casings to the windows as well. Here you see the window trimmed but the stool (sill) is removable. I do this because it’s easier for me to get the proper reveal on the sill this way. Most will set the stool first and work off of that. So I’m different – deal with it 🙂

6 tight stoolStools in place and fastened.

7 casing blockAs mentioned earlier – I use templates and whatever to make things go quicker and more accurate. I use this block of wood to get the reveal the same all around. Make the block flush with the jamb and you have a uniform reveal. The clamp comes in handy when the side casing might be a little bowed. A little pressure on the clamp and it will straighten it out.

8 octagon jambsThe octagon window jamb was easy. I had made two when I installed the same window in the upstairs closet.

9 octagon casing cutThe eight pieces are cut for the casing – looks like it’ll work.

10 pocket screw jigTo assemble I make one pocket hole with a Kreg tool. Only one is needed, as it’s mainly used as a way to clamp the pieces together.

11 finished octagonThe finished casing glued and ready to put up.

12 bookcase wallThe casing up and all the windows have been trimmed and back banded – all but these two, which get bookcases built around them – that I haven’t designed yet. Nothing like waiting to the last minute. But I have my yellow pad there…

12 window casing with back bandHere are the two big boys – 8’6″ each. All trimmed out with back banded casing. (That’s the piece that ‘picture frames’ the side and head casing) and the apron below the stool (sill).

13 waspAnd all the time this guy kept me company. I think it was his uncle I was swatting at when I fell off the ladder last year.

This time I left him alone – lesson learned.

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Sunroom Window Trimming

  1. Trimming out the windows is exactly the information we’re going to need. I’m pinning it so I can remember where it is. Good stuff. Jo @ Let’s Face the Music

  2. Once again I’m grateful to be just a few steps behind you. Thanks for your focus on the practical details. So you’re going how far beyond the drywall, a sixteenth, an eighth? Not that I need to know yet; I think I’ll have two standard sized jambs in the house.

    • Hey Chad – thanks! The width of the jambs need to be just a little past the drywall surface – it really depends how flat the drywall is. The easiest way is to cut a short length of jamb the width you need and check all the way around the window opening to make sure it is slightly proud of the wall surface. If just a little, you can hammer the drywall edge down a fraction. Also, I used a back band on the window trim which you can make to fit if there is a gap between the casing and the wall.

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