Mid August Progress and Color Changes

I know it’s been a while since my last post. Lots of activity at the MisAdventures project. So I thought I’d share a photo-rich post of the shenanigans here in southern Indiana.

1 kitchen flooringFirst up is the laying of 1/2″ BC plywood over all of the existing first floor. This is the kitchen area looking towards the sunroom. The original 3/4″ T&G pine floor gets overlayed with the plywood glued and screwed every 8 inches and also screwed through the floor joists. This adds a great deal of stiffness to the floor that will have 3/4″ oak flooring.

2 coffee canI guess you had make do with what was handy. This old coffee can lid was used as a patch over a larger hole in the floor. Looks like the plumbing had been moved several times over the 80+ year history of this house.

3 corner repairThe two first floor offices have the original plaster lathe walls and ceilings. I spent many hours grinding out cracks and repairing with plaster. The final corner crack is cut out and repaired with fiberglass mesh and hot mud plaster.

4 crown mouldingThe other office got a new crown molding and paint. Here’s a test fit – and I have to admit to failure in the coping corner ability. I tried the proper way by coping the corner and just couldn’t get a good fit. Mitering the corner is not the way it should be done – but it sure looks better than what my poor coping saw skills produced.

5 closet doorThe original doors were all sanded and repainted and fitted with those fancy door knobs and plates.New hinges and mortise latches will let these doors hang around for another 80 years.

6 tv boxBefore I finished laying the plywood underlayment I was able to run a couple more cables and power for a recessed TV box. Trimmed out the doors and painted everything.

7 new office paintSince I had to repair the cracked corner in my wife’s office – it gave her a chance to change colors – so the walls now are a more saturated blue/green instead of sky blue.

8 ceiling medallionsI found a couple of smaller ceiling medallions laying around from the previous owner. I reconfigured them with some bondo and put them up. The bead detail matches the door plates and the large medallion in the living room.

9 skirt board cuttingOne more thing before we head to the woman cave. The stairs from the 1st floor to the 2nd needed skirt boards. One side is 14′ long and the other is 16′. Here I’m cutting the angles using a cardboard template. I use a lot of cardboard for angle cuts – just to make sure.

10 stair skirt boardsThe stair skirt boards slide in next to the outside stair stringers. I left a space when mounting the stringers so that these trim pieces could fit easily. If you don’t allow for the skirt you’ll have to scribe cut the whole skirt – and that’s no fun. The risers and treads will butt up against the skirt board.

Now for something completely different

11 tub plumbingI gave up on hiring plumbers and started doing my own plumbing. Here I’ve got the all the copper fitted to the tub deck filler. The pipes look a little  crooked in this photo – but it’s just the camera angle.

12 Josh Craig tileHere’s Josh Craig – the tile guy. He’s one mean mamma-jamma when it comes to tile. He’s spent over a month on this bathroom, so he might not win a race, but the finished product is worth the wait.

13 tile patternAll the tile in the basement is porcelain from Atlas Concord. I added two vertical panels of this lotus flower design in the shower. I had Josh cut the tiles in two to run them vertically. It’s very subtle, but adds a little interest to the shower without being too obvious. The green doo-dads keep all the tiles flush, with very little ‘lippage’.

14 tile floor.I have a floor border with mosaic inserts to match the design of the shower floor. The green stuff is a crack isolating membrane called Green Skin.

15 color changeI was never a fan of the Italian Ice green color Francia selected for the bath. Now that the tile is going in she also though it was too pale. So time for another color change. Good thing it’s only paint – and my labor. No problem –  a couple of hours and all will be forgotten. Looks like BM Boothbay Grey it is.

16 paint startFirst we do a little cutting in.

17 new colorI think the grey will be a little more relaxing. We’ll see what happens – who knows what the future holds..

So there you have the latest update – more to come.

 

 

Mid July Roundup – Doors and Floors

It seems as I march towards making this place into a habitable dwelling – the photos just don’t seem that interesting. I know the good stuff is right around the corner, but it’s hard to grab a camera and take a picture of so many ho-hum projects. So here’s what happening now at the Misadventures project.

1 sunroom lightI left off with these sunroom lights installed because I needed the space in the garage. I was worried the scale might be too large, but they fit between the beams fine. You will see my problem in the background. The wall sconces were placed to correspond to the windows. Unfortunately, this left an awkward gap between the lights. You can see I’m fiddling with a cardboard design to balance out the space. We’ll see how this turns out.

2 window casingThis is a view from the kitchen into the sunroom. I’m casing the last window and one of the final door openings.

3 plywood underlaymentLooking back into the kitchen area you can see I’m adding a 1/2″ BC plywood underlayment, glued and screwed to the 3/4″ T&G pine floor. There is a 14′ island that runs down the middle of this space.

4 plaster wall damageI kept two rooms with original plaster lathe walls and ceilings. This is what was behind the baseboard. We’ll repair this before we replace the trim.

5 bondo fillerAll the doors get new hinges, mortise locks, plates and knobs. So of course the new door strikes don’t fit the originals. First I use auto bondo to fill in the areas that would show with the new striker plate. The pencil marks show the new location.

6 door mortise jigAs usual, I made a jig that will make a fast and accurate cut to recess the plate. The jig has a piece that fits against the door stop. It is then screwed to the jamb so it won’t move.

7 router and jigThe router uses the jig frame to make an accurate cut for the recess.

8 door strike fittingThe test fit shows I didn’t get enough filler to cover the old hole. We’ll add a little more later.

9 marking mortiseThe jamb is marked for the latch hole that needs to be mortised.

10 drilling mortiseMake a couple holes with a forstner bit. This type of drill bit makes a flat bottomed hole. Then just use a wood chisel to square up the hole.

11 screw hole fixI usually fill the old screw holes anytime I replace a plate or hinge. Take a small diameter forstner bit and dill into the screw hole. Take a matching diameter wood dowel and glue it in place.

12 cutting dowelAfter the glue is dry, saw off flush. This not only gives you a clean start, but reinforces the wood around the original hole.

13 jamb sawTo get the 1/2″ plywood under the trim, I rented a jamb saw to make the cuts. 20.00 for 4 hours rental. Had all the doors cut and the tool back to Home Depot in an hour. This project would have taken all day with a regular saw.

14 close callBut I dodged another bullet – while I was handling the still spinning saw I nearly snagged my leg. It ripped my jeans but didn’t get any skin. Lucky this time.

Hope everyone is having a great and productive summer.  Till next time.

 

Mid June Roundup Still Stuff to Do

Happy Summer to all you fellow renovators! I only have one pretty picture to show you on this installment of MisAdventures.Lots going on, just not much that is picture-worthy. Sometimes I forget to snap a photograph, but most of the work has been tedious stuff like drywall finishing, painting and trim work. We’re closing in on finishing the basement project. More yet to do,  but almost livable. I’ll do a proper before and after post when it’s all done. But here’s were we are as of this morning.

1 basement ceilingI’ve got the basement ceiling in and all the drywall done in this room. It’s all painted with BM Moonlight White. I’ve got the 9 wall and ceiling speakers in and all of the led recessed lighting. The system is set up for a 70″ TV. As everywhere else in this house, I’ve got more than enough light. There are 32 hardwired light fixtures on this level.

2 basement electrical panelI still have to wire the final kitchen circuits and close this area up. I’ll figure some way to hide these boxes behind artwork or a chalkboard or something.

3 egress windowThe egress window is trimmed out and cased with PVC trim. I’ll add a one piece sill on the bottom and finish trim this window.

4 small basement windowThere are two small hopper style windows that are also trimmed in PVC. I like this material around windows. If it gets wet, no big deal as it’s 100% waterproof. No swelling or paint problems. I still paint the window’s trim with BM Impervo acrylic enamel in a white match which is the same color as the sunroom trim. The little door hides the whole house water shut off.

5 basement towards stairsLooking back towards the stair, there’s a little utility closet to the right of a small TV mount.

6 AV cabinetThe AV cabinet and all the wires. Just testing the lines with some old equipment before I start putting in the cable terminals and final set up.

7 door to utility roomHere is the extra deep door to the work room / utility room. This wall is a support wall dividing the woman cave from the work room. The concrete block wall was 8″ wide, plus two 4″ wide walls with spacing makes this about 18″ deep. I needed this door to swing in to the work room and have the widest possible opening.

10 doors to spa and pantryDoors are in for the bathroom on the left and the pantry on the right. I used single pane doors with  obscure glass on the doors to match the rest of the house and give it a vintage spa feel.

8 pantry cabinetInside the pantry area I built this removable storage cabinet. It has to be removable to get access to the bathroom inline fan. The little switch above the door is used to override the fan circuit that automatically comes on with the light in the bathroom.

9 well under stairsThis is the access to the well pump and sump pump under the stairs. I’ll be adding another tank to the pump system to add more capacity for watering the garden. The pipe stub outs are waiting for me to plumb in a utility sink and vanity.

11 spa door and shelving unitsInside the spa area I’ve built two cabinets – the one on the left will get a mirrored door and the one on the right gets open shelves for towels and baskets. All of the trim in this room is PVC.

12 spa vanity areaThe vanity wall has a medicine cabinet on the wall right of the sink. It’s placed here because the sink wall is a below grade exterior wall and it wouldn’t fit. We’ll see how this works out.It doesn’t really show, but the bathroom is painted with BM Italian Ice Green in their Matte bathroom paint.

13 spa steam showerThe steam shower is ready for tile. The tile guy will be here in a few weeks to finish this room and the pantry.

14 whirlpool tub surroundI’ve built the whirlpool tub surround panels. Again, made from PVC to make them waterproof. All the panels are removable to access the pump and plumbing. I’ll finish trim these when the tile is installed.

15 sunroom chandeliersAnd finally one pretty picture. I needed the space in the garage that these chandeliers were occupying, as they were in 4’X5′ boxes. I decided to go ahead and install them over the weekend, along with the wall sconces over the windows – since I’ve had them here waiting for this day since 2013.  This is a pair of Curry & Company Raintree Oval Chandeliers. I think they’ll make a good contrast to the medium valued wood floors when they go in. I love layering light, so I planned seven different light sources in this room. Recessed over head, Chandeliers, Two circuit track lighting, wall sconces, Bookcase accent, table lamps and window light. It is a white valued room, so the light sources will add texture and interest to the space. Or – that’s how I figured it.

We’ll see…. stick around.

 

 

 

Door Trim and Other Time Consuming Tasks

Well, fellow renovators my monthly update is in order. Still focused on the basement woman cave – and lots have been going on. I still haven’t gotten to the really pretty stuff, but we have to pay our dues in wading through the tedious stuff. So this episode focuses on that pesky door trim that you have to address if you have any type of hole in your wall.

1 cabinet insertsFirst we make a couple of plywood cabinet inserts. These are 3/4″ UV coated cabinet stock. They will go in the bathroom – the one on the left will get a door mirror. The one on the right is open towel storage. They’ll need trim, right?

2 inserts in placeAnd this is where they go in the bathroom. Uh, oh – looks like some complicated trim gymnastics coming up.

3 pvc trimFirst we figure out the pieces for the Tall cabinet and cut to size. This is PVC trim – all of the trim in the bathroom is made from this material.

4 marking trimThen we flip it over and mark where the screws will be drilled and a mark for the inside corner.

5 Kreg tool drillThen we drill the pocket screws using my cheap Kreg drill guide. This system is great to make quick work of cabinet projects like these face frames.

6 glueing trimEach joint is coated with PVC primer and then general purpose PVC cement. Keep the cement a little ways away from the front face of the joint to keep the front looking pretty.

7 fastening trimI then use a clamp to hold the pieces against the table surface while I set the screws. I use the clamp to keep the two pieces from shifting under pressure. This assures a nice flat face.

8 sanding flushIf you have kept the glue off the face, you can sand the joint flush immediately. If you have solvent on the front, you’ll have to wait a day or two to sand, as the glue softens the PVC and it will be impossible to get a flush joint.

9 trim pieces finishedOnce the two trim assemblies are finished, it’s time to make it a little more difficult.

10 trim pieces assembledThe trim to the right is for the door and the left is the trim around the cabinet insert. I’ve joined the two together to get super smooth joints. You’ll see how this all fits together in a later post. The two pressure clamps and a strip of PVC are used to stabilize this awkward piece without breaking the joints when moving to install.

Quick way to measure trim

Since I’ve done every door, window and cabinet in this place with all new trim that I fabricated,  I’ve had plenty of practice. Here is the simplest way I’ve found to measure and cut door trim.

11 trim spacerFirst make a spacer for the reveal of the trim. This is the space between the interior jamb of the door or window and the start of the casing (the flat part that goes around the opening.) I take one side of casing and space it with my template. Then clamp the piece in place.

12 trim clampedRepeat the process on the other side. Make the casing sides the same length and let the bottom edge rest on the floor.

13 marking header trimPlace a piece of casing along the top edge and mark the outside edge. I also put reference marks to keep pieces in order.

14 trim surround finishedI drill pocket screws and assemble just like I showed you earlier.  Keep the outer edge of the side casings flush to the top casing to make sure the reveal is correct. This makes a strong, flat joint and it will fit perfectly around your door.

Pretty stuff coming up in the next post. Promise.

Wednesday one shot

photo

Since I usually sell art, not make it – I thought I’d share my only artistic creation. This is looking up from the bottom of the Woman Cave stairwell. See? I told you there were lots of drywall corners. Happy Wednesday everyone.

Drywalling and stuff in the basement

Now that the staircase is finished enough to make it easy to get up and down the stairs, we can now lug more drywall to the basement with ease.

1 adding drywall

I’m using mold and moisture resistant drywall down here. Not sure why, because the humidity level in the basement is no different that the rest of the house. I’m using 4X8 sheets for the walls – that’s because that’s the largest size I can handle by myself.

4 electrical bulkhead

I had to make one more bulkhead by the electrical boxes to hide plumbing. I’ll figure out something to hide the breaker boxes.

7 mechanical room

Then continue along the walls and into the mechanical room and my little workshop. (I still have the 4 car garage to play in…so far). That mess of cat5e and coax cables are a job when my sawdust making period is over.

5 checking for drywall divots

I use a raking light to check for drywall divots before the primer goes on.

6 painting walls

Then the first coat of paint goes on – it’s BM Moonlight White – I think. The ceilings are being done by a drywall guy I know. They use 12′ sheets  – it will save my back and will look better than I could do.

2 whirlpool tubWhile I wait for the ceiling guy, I’ll finish up the framing for the whirlpool tub.

3 steam shower

And the framing and Kerdi Board prep is done for the steam shower.

See? Some things are looking finished – well, if you don’t look up, that is.

Pay attention now, I’m sure something pretty will pop up sooner or later.